Projects: Semi Annual Monitoring and Sample Analysis

American provided sampling and analytical services for a four day monitoring event at a New York based power plant.

The services included the set up of an ISCO Auto Sampler, to pull 24 hour composite samples. In addition, four hourly grab samples were collected daily for laboratory analysis, as well as “immediate analysis”  field parameters. Analytical procedures included Organics (Volatile and Semi Volatile compounds)  and Inorganics, including Metals, Hexavalent Chromium and Cyanide (both Total and Amenable).

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Projects: Water Pollution Control Facility

Full Suite Environmental Testing Parameters for Soil Waste Characterization

American Analytical is currently working with a Connecticut consulting firm on the Metropolitan District (MDC) Wet Weather Expansion Project (WWEP).

The purpose of this $350M project is to design new influent, primary, and wet weather treatment facilities at the Hartford Water Pollution Control Facility (HWPCF). American’s tasks for Contract 2012-21 included assisting in Phase II type environmental evaluations by providing analysis on soil samples for the HWPCF site and an off-site parcel, and characterizing soil for excavation during construction.

American analyzed environmental samples for organic and inorganic parameters, including volatiles, semi volatiles/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, RCRA metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons by CT ETPH method and RCRA characteristics in 16 samples in the initial phase, and will categorize nearly 200 samples in the second phase.

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RCRA Closure and Site Management Plan

American Analytical is working with a New York based Environmental Consultant in preparing a RCRA Closure and Site Management Plan for a former EPA regulated site on Long Island.

The environmental consultant is working closely with regulatory authorities to minimize costs for their client, while maintaining public health and safety.  All analytical samples are collected and analyzed with the highest degree of quality and accuracy.  Level IV Data Reports are prepared and submitted within 10 days of sample collection for regulatory review.

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Winter Newsletter

Although New Year’s Eve is often the time most associated with making resolutions and promises for the upcoming year, our Winter 2014 Newsletter  may be an excellent place to help make this year stand out – find great tips for making the best use of our resources for a safe, happy and healthy winter.  Stay warm!

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Spring 2014 Newsletter

After a long brutal winter, spring has finally arrived in New York and with it comes the promise of being outdoors – and new work!

We have used our winter time wisely, and have been modifying and updating our LIMS system to accommodate Category B, CLP type packages – not an easy task, by any means.  To offer the best services and capabilities to our clients, we felt the upgrade was necessary to support their environmental projects with data validator-friendly reports, easily created to provide all analytical data reporting requisites, including raw data and CLP reporting forms.

We also wanted to share some environmental news and interesting developments for  the local Long Island Waters in the Great South Bay – Suffolk County, the Nature Conservancy, and local environmental consultants are working on bringing public awareness of the plight of our local waters to the forefront of environmental policy.  Our local waters are a great source of leisure and income during the summer months   – find out what they are doing about it, and check the links to the left to see what you can do to help minimize our environmental impact.

Our Top Ten list this newsletter focuses on Ecology, and there are some points to ponder regarding our energy consumption and growing need for re-usable consumables.  Check the list and let us know what you think!

Spring is…to begin!

Spring 2014 Newsletter

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NASA Celebrates Earth Day with “Global Selfie” Event

Earth Day is April 22 this year…
NASA invites you — and everyone else on the planet — to take part in a worldwide celebration of Earth Day this year with the agency’s #GlobalSelfie event.

Global Selfie
NASA’s “Global Selfie” event is designed to encourage environmental awareness and recognize the agency’s ongoing work to protect our home planet.

For the first time in more than a decade, five NASA Earth-observing missions will be launched into space in a single year. To celebrate this milestone, NASA is inviting people all around the world to step outside on Earth Day, April 22, take a “selfie,” and share it with the world on social media.
Designed to encourage environmental awareness and recognize the agency’s ongoing work to protect our home planet, NASA’s “Global Selfie” event asks people everywhere to take a picture of themselves in their local environment.
On Earth Day, NASA will monitor photos posted to Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and Flickr. Photos posted to Twitter, Instagram or Google+ using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie, or to the #GlobalSelfie Facebook event page and the #GlobalSelfie Flickr group will be used to create a crowd-sourced mosaic image of Earth – a new “Blue Marble” built bit-by-bit with #GlobalSelfie photos.
NASA’s 17 Earth science missions now in orbit help scientists piece together a detailed “global selfie” of our planet day after day. Insights from these space-based views help answer some of the critical challenges facing our planet today and in the future: climate change, sea level rise, freshwater resources, and extreme weather events. NASA Earth research also yields many down-to-earth benefits, such as improved environmental prediction and natural hazard and climate change preparedness.
For more information on getting involved in the #GlobalSelfie Earth Day event, visit:
http://1.usa.gov/PfjXln
For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities in 2014, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow
-end-
Steve Cole
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0918
stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov

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Long Island, NY Top Ten Nature Preserves

Long Island has no shortage of various wildlife ecosystems and habitats. This is perfect for nature lovers, those looking to get away from a hectic schedule and reconnect with nature or anyone looking for cheap or free activities to enjoy with their friends. Explore the many wonders of the wild at any of these Long Island parks and nature preserves. Visitors will find all sorts of trees and plant life, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and more, all indigenous to the Long Island environment. A number of these preserves also have ecological education centers and museums where visitors may gain knowledge of Long Island’s natural habitats and history.

Long Island

1. Avalon Park and Preserve spreads across eight acres and is the recreation of the natural environments of Long Island discovered by the early settlers of New York. Highlights include a large duck pond, a boardwalk, footpaths and a labyrinth.
Avalon Park and Preserve, 200 Harbor Road, Stony Brook – (631) 689-0619

2. Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center, established in 1923, was the nation’s first bird sanctuary. The sanctuary provides quality educational resources as well as wildlife research and conservation.
Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center, 134 Cove Road, Oyster Bay – (516) 922-3200

3. The Cranberry Bog County Nature Preserve is a 165 acre preserve, all that remains of an abandoned cranberry-growing operation. Visitors will enjoy miles of hiking trails that allow for views of the Little Peconic River, and various bird, reptile, and plant specials plus plenty of other wildlife.

Cranberry Bog County Nature Preserve, Edwards Avenue South, Riverhead – (631) 854-4949

4. The Caleb Smith State Park Preserve is one of only two New York State nature preserves. This picturesque preserve comprised of over 543 acres containing nature trails, bird watching huts, a lake where fishing is permitted April through October, and a recently renovated Nature Museum with a number of exhibits.
Caleb Smith State Park Preserve, 581 West Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown – (631) 265-1054

5. The Connetquot River State Park is one of Long Island’s biggest, resting upon 3,473 acres of land. It contains over 50 miles of trails for hiking, horseback riding, cross country skiing, and nature walks. Fishing is allowed at Connetquot River with a permit.
Connetquot River State Park, Sunrise Highway, Oakdale – (631) 581-1005

6. Inside the Welwyn Nature Preserve visitors will find four trails leading along various ponds, swamps, salt marches and even a stretch of the Long Island Sound. Visitors will also get the chance to catch a glimpse of more than 100 species of birds, small mammals, reptiles, and other wildlife inhabiting the 204 acre preserve. It is also the home of the Holocaust Memorial & Educational Center.
Welwyn Nature Preserve, 100 Cresent Beach Road, Glen Cove – (516) 676-1474

7. The Tackapausha Museum and Preserve, an 84 acre sanctuary, is one of the more popular preserves on Long Island. Located in Seaford, it is rich with oak forests, ponds, streams, small mammals and many bird species. The five miles of marked trails make for wonderful and scenic hiking.
Tackapausha Museum and Preserve, Washington Avenue (at Merrick Road & Sunrise Highway), Seaford – (516) 571-7443

8. Sands Point Preserve offers visitors a delightful stroll on six marked trails through woodlands, fields, pond, and a stretch of beach on the Long Island Sound. Guided nature walks on the 216 acre preserve are available.
Sands Point Preserve, 127 Middleneck Road, Port Washington – (516) 571-7900

9. The Massapequa Preserve consists of 423 acres of land divided into three sections, intersected by major roadways. The Preserve is home to many rare and endangered Long Island plants and is home to the beginning of the Nassau-Suffolk Greenbelt Trail, the longest hiking trail in Nassau County. A license is required to fish in the various lakes and streams within the preserve.
Massapequa Preserve, Merrick Road and Ocean Avenue, Massapequa – (516) 571-7443

10. Muttontown Preserve contains 550 acres of fields, woodlands, ponds and miles of marked nature trails where visitors will see various local wildlife including birds, mammals and reptiles. Cross country skiing is available in the winter.
Muttontown Preserve, Muttontown Lane, East Norwhich – (516) 571-8500

This is just a small selection of the various parks, preserves and sanctuaries located on Long Island. Explore, and have fun!

Projects: Site Sampling and Analysis

American Analytical worked with a contractor on the Whitestone Expressway project for the NYC Dept of Design and Construction.

The project involved the installation of various utilities/infrastructure including sanitary/storm sewers and appurtenances, a water main, street lighting, and traffic signals along the eastern side of the Whitestone Expressway. Soil excavation required proper characterization management, transportation, and disposal of the excavated material. Project required testing soil and water from the soil borings along the way for a full suite of analytical parameters.

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Projects: Biosolids Analysis

Laboratory Testing to Support Land Application and Composting Programs

American performs laboratory testing to support Biosolids land application programs. Also known as sewage sludge, Biosolids are used to enhance agricultural and silvicultural production. Biosolids are the nutrient–rich organic byproducts resulting from wastewater treatment. Biosolids are not raw human waste, and do not include ash from incinerators, grit and screenings collected during preliminary treatment of wastewater, industrial residues, municipal solid waste, or hazardous waste. Biosolids can take several forms, including a liquid, a rich moist soil, a dried pellet, or compost. Biosolids, when used according to regulations, are safe and can be used as a soil amendment, a fertilizer, as an ingredient in compost, or as an energy source. American has the expertise necessary to assist you in your Biosolids program.

 

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